News

December 23, 2015
Most studies of delayed tuberculosis diagnosis focus on the adverse effect of time elapsed between the onset of symptoms to reaching diagnosis and subsequent patient outcomes and control of community transmission. A University of Georgia study takes a new angle on the issue and looks at the potential societal influence and prevention of diagnosis delay. TB is an infectious bacterial disease that...
November 20, 2015
Could climate change lead to more disease outbreaks and infections?  Dr. Erin Lipp, a professor of environmental health science at the UGA College of Public Health, was asked this audience-generated climate change question as part of CNN's Two Degrees series. An excerpt from Dr. Lipp's response:  Several diseases are sensitive to climate, among them diarrheal diseases and...
November 19, 2015
With flu season underway and outbreaks of measles and whooping cough often making the news, misconceptions regarding recommended vaccinations have the potential to put the nation’s health at risk. On Wednesday Dec. 2, the UGA College of Public Health and Athens Regional Health System invite the entire university community to attend a public forum aimed at addressing questions and concerns...
November 18, 2015
Dr. Marsha Davis, associate dean for outreach and engagement at the College of Public Health, is one of nine UGA faculty members selected to hone their leadership skills and gain a deeper understanding of the challenges and opportunities confronting research universities as members of the inaugural class of the university’s Women’s Leadership Fellows Program. The cohort includes representatives...
November 17, 2015
A UGA College of Public Health researcher has found that low levels of vitamin D may limit the effectiveness of HIV treatment in adults. Those with human immunodeficiency virus—commonly known as HIV—often struggle with declining health because their immune systems can't effectively respond to common pathogens. Their immune statuses, usually measured by CD4+T cells, normally...
November 11, 2015
Georgia’s charity health clinics produce cost savings when treating patients with hypertension, a new study from the UGA College of Public Health study has found. Serving patients with high blood pressure in Georgia Charitable Care Network clinics is less expensive than treating them in other settings, including by federally qualified health centers, by Medicaid providers and through...
November 10, 2015
Every year, 50,000 people die in East Africa from tuberculosis. Worldwide, 1.5 million people die from the disease. And when HIV infection is added to the mix, TB becomes even more deadly.  The University of Georgia fighting against these numbers with a new $1.49 million grant from the Fogarty International Center of the National Institutes of Health. UGA is partnering with Makerere...
November 3, 2015
Substance abuse treatments that target main issues such as serious drug and alcohol addiction are not frequently being used to also wean adolescents from tobacco, a University of Georgia study finds. Tobacco addiction in adolescents is oftentimes an overlooked issue because it doesn't carry with it the stigma that alcohol abuse and other serious drugs do, according to the study's lead...
October 13, 2015
Dr. Mark Ebell, professor of epidemiology and member of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, was recently interviewed by NBC News to talk about new recommendations encouraging blood pressure monitoring outside of the doctor's office. Read the entire piece on the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics news feed.
October 8, 2015
The University of Georgia College of Public Health has received a $500,000 gift to create the Karen and Jim Holbrook Distinguished Professorship and an endowed fellowship to support graduate students in the global health field.  Karen Holbrook served as UGA provost and senior vice president for academic affairs from 1998 to 2002 before being named president of The Ohio State University. Jim...
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