Cham E. Dallas Ph.D.

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Director

Barrow Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

Phone: 
706.542.5412
Fax: 
706.542.5254
Educational Background: 
Ph.D., Toxicology, University of Texas School of Public Health-Houston
M.S., Toxicology, University of Texas School of Public Health-Houston
Area of Specialty: 

Dr. Dallas has a national/international reputation in toxicology and issues regarding weapons of mass destruction (WMD), which has been established after a decade of research, teaching, and humanitarian efforts in Chernobyl-contaminated areas. Altogether, Dr. Dallas has had 20 years of experience world-wide on the toxicity of the components of WMD, including at over 40 institutions overseas. For seven years, Dr. Dallas was the Director of one of the largest University toxicology programs in the country, with 50 professors at the University of Georgia, and then for 5 years he was the Director of the Center for Mass Destruction Defense, a CDC Center for Public Health Preparedness. He currently is the Director of the Institute for Disaster Management (DMAN), and has received approximately $5 million in funding as Principal Investigator since 2001.

His Institute has established a nationally successful collaboration with the American Medical Association (AMA), the Medical College of Georgia, and the University of Texas for the development of the National Disaster Life Support (NDLS) family of courses: Basic Disaster Life Support (BDLS), Advanced Disaster Life Support (ADLS), and Core Disaster Life Support (CDLS). The NDLS has been accepted as a national standard for WMD training by the AMA, and has been taught in 45states to over 60,000 health care personnel . Dr. Dallas and DMAN are currently conducting mass casualty evaluation exercises for Georgia hospitals, as well as devising evacuation planning for special needs populations. He was also asked three times to give presentations at the United Nations on what we have learned from the Chernobyl nuclear accident that will better prepare the world for the use of terrorist nuclear weapons. He has been the recipient of several teaching awards, including a University-wide award (out of 2000 professors). He has written scores of research papers for the scientific community and educational articles for the public on the toxic components of WMD.

Research Interests: 

Disaster preparedness, emergency response, and mass casualty management.

Professional Affiliations: 

Dr. Dallas has a national/international reputation in toxicology and issues regarding weapons of mass destruction (WMD), which has been established after a decade of research, teaching, and humanitarian efforts in Chernobyl-contaminated areas. Altogether, Dr. Dallas has had 20 years of experience world-wide on the toxicity of the components of WMD, including at over 40 institutions overseas. For seven years, Dr. Dallas was the Director of one of the largest University toxicology programs in the country, with 50 professors at the University of Georgia, and then for 5 years he was the Director of the Center for Mass Destruction Defense, a CDC Center for Public Health Preparedness. He currently is the Director of the Institute for Disaster Management (DMAN), and has received approximately $5 million in funding as Principal Investigator since 2001.

His Institute has established a nationally successful collaboration with the American Medical Association (AMA), the Medical College of Georgia, and the University of Texas for the development of the National Disaster Life Support (NDLS) family of courses: Basic Disaster Life Support (BDLS), Advanced Disaster Life Support (ADLS), and Core Disaster Life Support (CDLS). The NDLS has been accepted as a national standard for WMD training by the AMA, and has been taught in 45states to over 60,000 health care personnel . Dr. Dallas and DMAN are currently conducting mass casualty evaluation exercises for Georgia hospitals, as well as devising evacuation planning for special needs populations. He was also asked three times to give presentations at the United Nations on what we have learned from the Chernobyl nuclear accident that will better prepare the world for the use of terrorist nuclear weapons. He has been the recipient of several teaching awards, including a University-wide award (out of 2000 professors). He has written scores of research papers for the scientific community and educational articles for the public on the toxic components of WMD.

Selected Publications: 

Dallas, C.E. and Bell, W.C. Extreme Inadequacy of Mass Burn Casualty Response to Urban Nuclear Attack. Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, In Press, (2007).

Dallas, C.E. Emergency Planning and the Future of Chernobyl. World Ecology Report 19(2): 38-44 (2007).

Bell, W.C. and Dallas, C.E. Vulnerability of populations and the urban health care systems to nuclear weapon attack – examples from four American cities. International Journal of Health Geographics 6:5 pp1-33 (2007). This publication is currently the 3rd most accessed biomedical paper worldwide in the last year (out of 170 journals on biomedcentral, over 30,000 accesses), see: www.biomedcentral.com/mostviewed (click on most viewed articles in past year).

Cockerham, L.G., Walden, T.L., Dallas, C.E., Mickley, G.A. and Landauer, M.R. “Ionizing Radiation,” Principles and Methods of Toxicology (A. Wallace Hayes, Ed.), 5th Edition, CRC Press (Boca Raton, Florida), pp. 897–982. (2007).

Dallas, C.E., Nuclear Detonation, Chapter 18, Medical Response to Terrorism, (Keyes, C., Pepe, P., Swienton, R., Schwartz, R., Ed.), Medical Response to Terrorism (Lippincott, New York), pp. 174 � 185 (2004).

Basic Disaster Life Support, Version 2.5, American Medical Association, (Chicago, IL), Dallas, C.E., Schwartz, R., Pepe, P., James, J., Lillibridge, S., Editors, (2003).

Pepe, P.E., Schwartz, R., Dallas, C.E., Lillibridge, S., Swienton, R., Coule, P., James, J. The National Advanced Disaster Life Support (ADLS) course, American Heart Association Circulation (supplement) 108(17):IV-1033 (2002)

Rowe, D.E., Dallas, C.E., and Perro, R.L. Biological/Chemical Terrorism and the University

Dallas, C.E. Pulmonotoxicity: Toxic Effects in the Lung, Chapter 9, Industrial Toxicology (Williams, P.J. and Burson, J.L., eds.), John Wiley Co. (New York), pp. 169 - 187 (2000)

Holloman, K.A., Dallas, C.E., Jagoe, C.H., Tackett, R., Kind, J.A., and Rollor, E.A. Interspecies differences in oxidative stress response and radiocesium uptake in rodents inhabiting areas highly contaminated by the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 19: 2830-2834 (2000).

Dallas, C.E. Mass Casualty Management and Emergency Response for Large-Scale Weapons of Mass Destruction Events International Journal of Toxicology 16(9):19 (2000).

Dallas, C.E., Age and Species Susceptibility to Toxicity from Environmental Radioactivity Due to the Chernobyl Disaster, 8th Annual Meeting United Nations Conference on Health and the Environment, Health and the Environment: Global Partners for Global Solutions (United Nations, New York), Vol. 8, p. 1 (1999).

Dallas, C.E., Lingenfelser, S., Lingenfelser, J.T., Holloman, K., Jagoe, C.H., Kind, J.A., Chesser, R.K., and Smith, M.H. Flow cytometric analysis of leukocyte and erythrocyte DNA from Chernobyl-contaminated ponds in the Ukraine, Ecotoxicology 7: 211-219 (1998).

Parshkov, E.M., Chebotareva, I.V., Sokolov, V.A., and Dallas, C.E. Additional thyroid dose factor from transportation sources in Russia following the Chernobyl disaster, Environmental Health Perspectives 105(6): 1491-1496 (1997).

Dallas, C.E. and Atwood, C.H. Chemical and biological dosimetry of radionuclides from the Chernobyl nuclear accident, Proceedings of the American Chemical Society (1997).

Dallas, C.E. "Aftermath of the Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster: Pharmaceutical Needs in the Republic of Belarus," American J. of Pharmaceutical Education 57: 182-185 (1993).

Dallas, C.E. and Evans, D. Flow cytometry and toxicity analysis, Nature 345: 557-558 (1990).